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DISCUSSION ON PATRISTIC THOUGHT

Saint Kosmas the Aetolian as a Missionary

+By Metropolitan Augustinos (Kantiotes) of Florina *(1.) INTRODUCTION A holy anniversary has recently been celebrated in Greece: this past 24th of August marked the passage of 180 years from the very day on which a glorious son of a Northern Epirian village on the shore of the Apsus River, next to the city of Veratios, finished the course of his ... Read More »

Saint John Chrysostom and 21st Century Christians

Taken from a lecture by Fr. Josiah Trenham and republished on Mystagogy. From Mystagogy: [The following portion of a lecture (all of which I recommend to be read) delivered by the Very Reverend Josiah Trenham in 2007 I found to be a very edifying piece on how Christians can implement at least some of the counsels of St. John Chrysostom into our own lives today. ... Read More »

St. Basil the Great and Christian Philanthropy

By John G. Panagiotou Many things are said and written about the great Cappodocian Father of the 4th century St. Basil the Great of Caesarea. In Basil the Great, we find the consummate theologian, liturgical scholar, ascetic and evangelist of the Faith. Too often, however, one more aspect of Basil is left overlooked and that is Basil as the first ... Read More »

The Lenten Prayer of Saint Ephraim explained

A SPIRITUAL CHECKLIST Orthodox Christians recite a prayer during Great Lent that is described by Fr. Alexander Schmemann as a “check list” for our spiritual lives. This prayer, given by St. Ephraim the Syrian in the fourth century, is commonly called the “Lenten Prayer:” O Lord and Master of my life! Take from me the spirit of sloth, faint-heartedness, lust ... Read More »

The Three Hierarchs and Education

In the 11th century, at the time of Emperor Alexios Komninos, the common feast of the three great Fathers of the Church, Saint John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, Saint Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople and Basil the Great, Archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia was established to honour their supreme contribution to education, their unshakeable and zealous faith in God ... Read More »

The Patristic Understanding of the Virgin Birth of Christ

Where God Wills The Order Of Nature Is Overruled “And so it was, that, while they were there, the days were accomplished that she should be delivered” (Lk. 2:6). Concerning the birth of Christ, the Prophet Isaiah spoke thus: “Behold she that travailed brought forth, before the travail-pain came on, she escaped it and brought forth a male” (Is. 66:7). ... Read More »

Why Jesus Had To Be Virgin Born: St. Maximus the Confessor Explains

By Metropolitan Hierotheos Vlachos Pleasure and Pain According to St. Maximus the Confessor In his Centuries on Theology St. Maximus the Confessor refers to the nexus of the dualism of pleasure and pain, which, by any standard, is an important subject. This means that we cannot discuss Orthodox Theology if we fail to face this crucial point, because the transcendence ... Read More »

A Brief Discussion on the Legacy of St Gregory Palamas

Prologue The following work is a summary of a recent parish fellowship discussion. The theme as the title suggests was a discussion that explored some of the key themes of the work and life of St Gregory Palamas. This is not an exhaustive study but an outline of what was examined, and a basic appraisal for Orthodox Christian spiritual practice. ... Read More »

A Song of Repentance: The Great Canon of St Andrew of Crete

Introduction The experience of Lent is a spiritual journey whose purpose is to transfer us from one spiritual state to another, a dynamic passage. For this reason the church commences Lent with the great repentance Canon of St Andrew of Crete. This  repentant lamentation conveys to us the scope and depth of sin, shaking the soul with despair, repentance, and ... Read More »

THE IMAGE OF THE SUN IN ST GREGORY PALAMAS

Introduction The purpose of this article is to explore St Gregory Palamas’ use of the analogy of the sun in his work The One Hundred and Fifty Chapters[1] in order to assess its value within the context of his exposition of the various doctrinal themes covered therein. Focusing on those chapters which express the sun analogy, the article will discuss ... Read More »