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Tag Archives: Gabe Martini

Reading Scripture in Tradition: Why Sola Scriptura doesn’t work

By Gabe Martini Orthodox Christians do not hold to the Reformation principle of Sola scriptura. Instead, we view the scriptures as the pinnacle or “summit”1 of holy tradition, neither separating the two as wholly distinct, nor eliminating one or the other. The reason for this is simple: the scriptures are a witness to divine revelation, given from God to mankind (and ... Read More »

LITURGICAL HERMENEUTICS AND THE MEANING OF SCRIPTURE

By Gabe Martini Contemporary scholars and certain Christian groups today tend to approach the study of scripture as archaeology. Rather than receiving the scriptures as God-breathed tradition in the life of the Church, the text is abstracted from its incarnate context, subjected to scientific analysis. While much can be learned, of course, from a knowledge of Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew, this ... Read More »

SOLA SCRIPTURA VS. HOLY TRADITION: IS THERE A DIFFERENCE?

By Gabe Martini I have recently—and on a few other occasions—written about the differences between the Protestant approach to authority and the Orthodox. For Protestants, the final authority or rule is the Bible—a principle known as Sola Scriptura. And while some Protestants have written catechisms and other companion material to the scriptures themselves, these too are held in check by the ... Read More »

THE STRENGTH OF ORAL TRADITION

By Gabe Martini In a world characterized by the rationalism of the Enlightenment and the instant knowledge of Google, it’s hard to believe things have not always been so. In the ancient world, ideas, customs, stories, and even history were committed primarily not to books, but rather memorized through both poetry and song. They were preserved through oral tradition. And of ... Read More »

THE TEMPLE CULT AND EARLY CHRISTIAN WORSHIP

By Gabe Martini The Judaism of the first century was a religion almost entirely centered around the sacrificial worship of the temple. Faithful pilgrims traveled many miles from all around the diaspora to worship at the temple several times a year, and the temple was central to their faith and piety. While various forms of post-Christian Judaism today are more centered ... Read More »

Is the Septuagint a Divinely Inspired Translation?

By Gabe Martini For many Orthodox Christians throughout the centuries, the Septuagint (LXX) has been received as a preferred edition of the Old Testament scriptures. There are many reasons for this. The bulk of OT citations from the early Church fathers are aligned with the Septuagint (and other Greek translations), and the New Testament authors seemed to prefer it nearly nine times ... Read More »